International network for natural sciences – research journal
  • mendeley icon
  • linkedin icon
  • google plus icon
  • twitter icon
  • google scholar icon
  • facebook icon

Comparative in vivo antidiabetic evaluation of leaves and bark of Berberis lycium Royle in alloxan induced diabetic rabbits

By: Muhammad Qadeer, Waheeda Mushtaq, Muhammad Ishtiaq, Musfirah Anjum Muhammad Faisal, Mubashir Mazhar

Key Words: Diabetics; Berberis lycium Royle, Azad Kashmir, Rats, Insulin.

Int. J. Biosci. 11(1), 449-456, July 2017.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12692/ijb/11.1.449-456

Certification: ijb 2017 0050

Abstract

The aim of this study was to measure minerals in Berberis lycium leaves and bark to evaluate the effects of its methanolic extract on diabetic rabbits. For this study 15 female rabbits were used and were divided into five equal groups. For induction of diabetes in animals, Alloxan monohydrate was used. The animals were under treatment for 15 days. For healthy and diabetic control groups distilled water for treatment control group glucophage for the fourth and fifth diabetic groups Berberis lycium extract in respectively one gram dose were used daily. Blood samples were collected from veins of ears and glucose level was measured with autoanalyzer glucometer. The results of the study indicated that secondary metabolites level in Berberis lycium leaves was considerably high as compared to bark. In diabetic rabbits administered with Berberis lycium. The results showed that alkaloids, saponins, sterols, steroids, terpenoids, flavonoids, tannins, were present while anthraquinones and cumarins absent in the extract of Berberis lycium. In leaves alkaloids, saponins, sterols, steroids, terpenoids, flavonoids, tannins, were present while anthraquinones and cumarins absent in the extract of Berberis lyceum. Blood glucose levels measured at day 15 of rabbits treated with 1g extract of leaves (T´group) were (170±0.5773) and rabbits treated with 1g extract of bark (T1 group) were 299±0.57 rabbits treated with glucophage were (363±2.081) are significantly lower than diabetic group (533.33±0.33). The present investigation showed that the Berberis lycium leaves extract alleviates lipid profile level and might be used efficiently in especially (hyperglycemia) diabetic patients.

| Views 16 |

Comparative in vivo antidiabetic evaluation of leaves and bark of Berberis lycium Royle in alloxan induced diabetic rabbits

Ahmed M, Alamgeer, Sharif T, Muhammad ZCH, Akbar A. 2009. Effect of Berberis lycium Royle on lipid profile in alloxan induced diabetic rabbits, Ethnobotanical leaflets 13, 702-708.

Akhtar MS. 1992. Hypoglycaemic activities of some indigenous medicinal plants traditionally used as antidiabetic drugs. Journal Pakistan Medical Association 11(2), 271-277.

Alam SS, Khan AH, Sirhindi GA, Khan SA. 2005. Alloxan induced diabetes in rabbits. Pakistan Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences 22(2), 41-45.

Bhattacharjee SK. Handbook of Medicinal Plants, Pointer Publishers, Fourth Edition 1990: 2004.

Biyani MK, Banavalikar MM, Suthar AC, Shahani S, Sivakami S, Vidri J. 2003. Antihyperglycaemic effects of three extracts from Momordica charantia. Journal of Ethno pharmacology 88, 107-111.

Chand N, Durrani FR, Qureshi MS, Durrani Z. 2007. Role of Berberis lycium in reducing serum cholesterol in Broilers. Asian Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences 4, 563-568.

Hussain J, Khan AL, Rehman N, Hamayun M, Shinwari ZK, Malik W, Lee IJ. 2009. Assessment of herbal products and their composite medicinal plants through proximate and micronutrients analysis. Journal of Medicinal Plants Research 3(12), 1072-1077.

Madiseh MR, Heidarian E, Rafieian-kopaei M. 2014. Biochemical components of Berberis lycium fruit and its effects on lipid profile in diabetic rats. Journal of Medicinal Plants Research 3(1), 15-19.

Patel PM, Patel KN, Patel MN, Goyal RK. 2006. Development of HPTLC method for estimation of charantin in herbal formulations. Pharmacognosy Magazine 2, 224-226.

Ramachandran A, Snehalatha C, Shetty AS, Nanditha A. 2012. Trends in prevalence of diabetes in Asian countries. World Journal of Diabetes 3(6), 110-7.

Raman A, Lau C. 1996. Anti-diabetic properties and phytochemistry of Momordica charantia L. (Cucurbitaceae). Phytomedicine 2, 349-362.

Sicree R, Shaw J, Zimmet P. 2006. The Global Burden. Diabetes and Impaired Glucose Tolerance. Prevalence and Projections. In: Gan, D. ed. Diabetes Atlas, 3rd Edn. Brussels: International Diabetes Federation pp. 16-103.

Sofowora A. 2006. Medicinal Plants and Traditional Medicines in Africa. 2nd Ed., Spectrum Books Ltd., Ibadon, Nigeria pp. 151-153, 209-214.

Votey SR, Peters AL. 2004. Diabetes mellitus type 2. A review. Accessed July 2006.

Wadood N, Nisar M, Rashid A, Wadood A, Nawab G. 2007. Effect of a compound recipe (medicinal plants) onserum insulin levels of alloxan induced diabetic rabbits. Journal of Ayub Medical College Abbottabad 19 (1).

Yibchok AS, Adisakwattana S, Yao CY, Sangvanich P, Roengsumran S, Hsu WH. 2006. Slow acting protein extract from fruit pulp of Momordica charantia with insulin secretagogue and insulinomimetic activities. Biological and Pharmaceutical Bulletin 29(6), 1126-31.

Muhammad Qadeer, Waheeda Mushtaq, Muhammad Ishtiaq, Musfirah Anjum Muhammad Faisal, Mubashir Mazhar.
Comparative in vivo antidiabetic evaluation of leaves and bark of Berberis lycium Royle in alloxan induced diabetic rabbits.
Int. J. Biosci. 11(1), 449-456, July 2017.
http://www.innspub.net/ijb/comparative-vivo-antidiabetic-evaluation-leaves-bark-berberis-lycium-royle-alloxan-induced-diabetic-rabbits/
Copyright © 2017
By Authors and International Network for
Natural Sciences (INNSPUB)
http://innspub.net
brand
innspub logo
english language editing
  • CALL FOR PAPERS
    CALL FOR PAPERS
    Publish Your Article
  • CALL FOR PAPERS
    CALL FOR PAPERS
    Submit Your Article
INNSPUB on FB
Email Update